Home History In the heat of a New Orleans summer, the Black Death scurried in

In the heat of a New Orleans summer, the Black Death scurried in

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Black Death New Orleans

You may think that rats are a nuisance now, but back in 1914, their presence in New Orleans was dire.

That summer, a Swedish sailor died here, and an autopsy revealed his illness to be none other than the bubonic plague – also known as the Black Death. The disease, which is transmitted by flea-bitten rats, infected over 30 people in New Orleans, killing 10.

But authorities fought back, proofing homes and businesses with concrete foundations and wire mesh fortifications, fumigating ships with carbon monoxide, and setting out poison and traps for the rodents. For more, please visit THNOC’s website.

– Eli Haddow, The Historic New Orleans Collection

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